beginners to advanced 

Note: The list of questions directly below tells you what will be answered further below. In other words, this list has no jump links directly to the question and answer.


Am I too old?

Am I too young?
Can I just drop in to a class rather than attend regularly?
Do I have to sign up in advance?
Who takes classes?
What is the right level?
I am or might be a beginner. Is the beginner class too hard/too easy for me?
How do I arrange for the extra help right before a scheduled beginners class?
My account seems to be wrong. It looks like I’m being overcharged/undercharged?

How does paying for classes work? 



Am I too old?

Not if you can climb the stairs leading to the studio.

Am I too young?

You have to be able to take classes with adults. The youngest current student is 8. (Howard’s daughter started in a class when she was 6.) For most children, it works better to wait until age 10, unless they’ve already had some training elsewhere. However, we understand that you might not want to wait and can provide a referral to a program with all-kids classes for younger students.

Can I just drop in to a class rather than attend regularly?

Yes, although most people don’t do that. But drop-ins are welcomed, and in class we work on material that works for everyone. The only limiting factor for a newcomer is if the tap level chosen is not the correct one, in which case, there would be no charge for the lesson.

Do I have to sign up in advance?

Only if the class description says so. But it’s a really good idea in all cases. For example, if you sign up in advance, Howard would then know to contact you if a class is canceled. And if he sees that a first-time beginner has signed up, he will contact that person in advance and try to schedule extra help for that person.

Who takes classes?

We were hoping you’d ask. Here’s a partial list: true beginners; tap teachers who need a break from teaching or a tap booster shot; children who have artistic interests that are slightly off the beaten path; recreational or serious hoofers who are now retired; people who are now retired who always wanted to tap; parents of young children who need to do something for themselves; magicians who want to add spice to their act; actors/singer who want to add/enhance a skill; refugees from other tap classes; people who like old musicals; drummers; performers preparing for an audition; dancers who need a safer dance form that they can pursue into old age; lovers of jazz; musicians who want to dance; “broadway tappers” who want to transition into rhythm tap; those of various ages who took tap as a kid or youth and want to get back into it; couples who want a fun activity together; tappers who want to learn to improvise; tappers who hate to improvise.

What is the right level?

We’ll figure that out together, but if you guess wrong, you won’t be charged for a lesson.

I am or might be a beginner. Is the beginner class too hard/too easy for me?

Let’s talk. Typically, We will restart the start-from-scratch class twice a year. Currently, though, the inquiries have been small in number but steady. So, people have had the choice of 1) jumping in, 2) arriving early (by arrangement) for free extra help for as long as needed, or 3) taking a private lesson or two. If you’re not quite a beginner, it usually helps to start in the beginners class to fill in possible gaps in your technique or learn our building-block approaches. 

How do I arrange for the extra help right before a scheduled beginners class?

Follow these steps: 1) sign up for a scheduled class 2) contact Howard by email at least two days before the class and request the extra time 3) wait for his confirmation that he is available 4) show up for the extra help.

My account seems to be wrong. It looks like I’m being overcharged/undercharged?

Alert Howard. We can fix it.


How does paying for classes work?


This could seem complicated at first, but the essence is easy to understand. If you are organized enough to make a reservation AND pay in advance, group classes are $7.50 apiece.  Otherwise, classes are $15 apiece, but you never pay a total of more than $15 on any one day. To get unlimited classes for 30 days , you pay $61. This system starts Feb. 1.


All the details and rules needed to make this system work are explained below. 


(f you need help with the older system (through Jan. 31), ask Howard.)


New System (starting Feb. 1, 2018)
A lesson will either cost 1 credit or 2 credits. Each credit is $7.50.

Individual lesson price with no discounts:
$15 per lesson or 2 credits

A full-day pass for all lessons on one day:
$15 or 2 credits

Discounts:
If you pay in advance AND reserve in advance (you must do both), lesson price is:
$7.50 or 1 credit

No show fee:
$7.50 or 1 credit
(A “no show fee” applies if you make a reservation, don’t take the class and don’t cancel the reservation at least six hours before the class.)

Group Lesson Packages:
$15 for 2 credits (must be used within 30 days)
$30 for 4 credits (must be used within 60 days)
$60 for 8 credits (must be used within 90 days)

Unlimited Lessons for 30 days:
$61
If you are in this plan, you don’t have to make reservations, but you should in case the class fills up. You will not have to pay a no-show penalty (but please don't abuse this privilege). The 30 days begins on the first day you use this package.

Day Pass
$15 for as many classes and rehearsals as you like (and qualify for) on one day.

Notes:
For all lesson payments, there will be a small credit card fee if you purchase by credit card at the studio. No fee if you purchase at home.

Lessons or credits DO expire if you don’t use them within the period allowed.

For most classes, no reservations are required although an unreserved lesson will cost two credits instead of one.

Financial aid is available on a case-by-case basis. Inquire if you need to.

YOU ASK, WE ANSWER